And Just How Can You Live Your Fierce?

You do not have to be an extreme sports junkie, an Olympic athlete or a technology entrepreneur to be living your fierce. I truly believe that there is something in everyone that lights a fire, that floats their boat, that can encompass every part of one’s being.

I have friends who have left their careers as architects to write one of hopefully many  beautiful children’s books. That’s living your fierce. Another friend started a small business after having a child because work and creation is what drives her to be a wonderful mother. Other’s chase 50 kilometer trails, closing that big account at their firm, or learning a new language so they can experience more of the culture when they travel. These are all ways others have found to live their fierce.

Before any of these individuals could begin living their fierce, they all took some hard time to figure out who they really are, what they really want to do and why they really want to do what they chose to go after. This requires a level of self-reflection that we are all capable of, but may just need that reminder every now and again to do.

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Maria Stenvenkel wrote about “7 Things You Need to Know to Live Your Best Life and Make a Better World” in one of her latest blog posts. She touches on a handful of really powerful themes to explore that may help you figure out how you can begin, or continue, to live your life fiercely. For the full article, click here.

  1. You’re 100 percent responsible for your life.

  2. The thing that annoys you about others is a reflection of you.

  3. What you admire about others is a quality you long to express.

  4. You can’t drive out darkness with darkness.

  5. People are always doing the best they can.

  6. You have to accept what you don’t like about your life to move forward.

  7. You matter immensely.

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So take some time to yourself or chat with a friend, just make sure you do it because your life is waiting for you to start living it fiercely!

 

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Certain realities of money

Money. A reality and necessity of living. Especially in the wealthy, developed land we live in. A reality that has recently given me a not-so subtle kick in the pants. The pleasure of training and pursuing one’s dream without making much money (certainly not enough money to afford solo-rent, gas, organic/ free-range / GMO-free food, evenings at the local craft-brewery and any sort of plane ticket to anywhere) can apparently only go on for so long.

The difference between needing and wanting when it comes to the above mentioned list of creature comforts can get quite blurred with me. Living on my own gives me my coveted personal sanctuary. But the price tag on that, especially in Vancouver, is steep. My grocery delivery service allows me to eat good food, save time and avoid impulse purchases at the grocery store (whose checkout lines are a constant test of will against all of the rubbish magazines, chocolate bars and candy that call to you as you wait for your kale and avocados to be scanned and bagged). The personal and social benefits of enjoying a cold summer pilsner or warm amber ale with friends at the local watering hole are self-explanatory. A 6-pack of Glacier at home just cannot properly lift one’s spirits or quench one’s thirst. And then there are my monthly training expenses. Let’s just say they border on ridiculous.

The reality is that at some point, you either need to make some decent money to live or you have to say goodbye to ALL of those creature comforts we cannot seem to live without. I recently hit such a crossroads and found myself on the side with regular massages, farmer’s market double smoked bacon and surf sessions on the Oregon coast. I can only imagine how relieved my father was when I told him that I needed to venture back to the dark side of paper pushers and weekend warriors. I signed a year’s contract to run a gymnastics centre while my boss is on maternity leave. Unlike my previous job where I had to build up the gym from scratch, my sole responsibilities are to hold down the fort for a year and not make too many changes or mistakes. Not an entirely difficult task. And this deal was sweetened with enough flex time and freedom to continue a scaled-down version of my training regime.

First day on the job, obviously had to do a handstand...

First day on the job, obviously had to do a handstand…

I certainly didn’t jump at this endeavour right away as, with all decisions, there is an opportunity cost. That cost for me was training and networking time. For each hour on the job equaled one less hour I could train or one less hour I could meet a stunt industry professional on set for possible big break. But here’s the reality of it. I love a challenge, I love a regular paycheque (as I equate it to the hours of kickboxing lessons I can take and all of the exotic places I can escape to on my ‘vacation’ time) and I have a very hard time saying no. This is a great opportunity with a fixed timeline.

The traditionalist people in my life jumped for joy and offered little sympathy as I hung up my freedom to rejoin the working classes. The free-spirited people in my life, embracing alternative lifestyles were cautiously supportive. At the end of the day, the ability so save some more money away for a future bout “professional acquirer of stunt-related skills”, mixed with working for an awesomely energetic management and admin team who have graced me with some flexibility, made it very difficult to turn down. Do I feel like I have betrayed big dreams? Temporarily, yes. But that evening glass of organic vino, trip home to hold my new nephew and the occasional visit to the acupuncturist are pretty nice too.

AthleteInspired